Tuesday, May 06, 2008

RCA statement on invalidating Israeli Conversions

The Rabbinical Council of America, having taken note of the recent ruling of the Bet Din Elyon (Rabbinic Court of Appeals) of Israel, nullifying certain conversions performed by the State Conversion Authority led by Rabbi Chaim Druckman, has today issued the following statement:

Having reviewed the ruling of the Bet Din Elyon in detail, and being fully mindful of the respect due the rulings of duly constituted rabbinical courts in their respective jurisdictions, the RCA finds it necessary to state for the record that in our view the ruling itself, as well as the language and tone thereof, are entirely beyond the pale of acceptable halachic practice, violate numerous Torah laws regarding converts and their families, create a massive desecration of God's name, insult outstanding rabbinic leaders and halachic scholars in Israel, and are a reprehensible cause of widespread conflict and animosity within the Jewish people in Israel and beyond. The RCA is appalled that such a ruling has been issued by that court.

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

Nice to see the RCA flexing some muscles and attempting to correct a half-baked, politically-motivated and needlessly stupid and cruel halakhic ruling. I am actually surprised to see the usually wishy-washy RCA showing some balls!

Leora said...

I'm sorry about all this tsuris.

Did you see this:
converting child to Judaism?

Caroline made it clear that she wanted Meg to be raised Jewish,” Malka Esther, a Jewish friend of Caroline’s, says by e-mail from her New Jersey home. Having helped the family with some of its questions about Judaism, she adds, “I was with her the day of her conversion [in 2001], and it clearly meant the world to her to convert.

Leora said...

One more note: I find it ironic that converts are scrutinized with a fine tooth comb as to their actions. But someone like me, born to 2 Jewish parents and raised in an observant home, nobody seems notice whether I do action x or action y al pi halacha (or not do, is more to the point).

ilanadavita said...

Fine reaction.